Provence, France: Travel Guide

Provence, France travel guide

Provence is a magnificent region that is shaped similarly to a quiche. A sunbathed crust stretches along the coast of the Mediterranean from Marseille to Camargue and north along what is known as the Rhone Valley. Historically, the Romans who once resided in the area left behind many ruins, which are some of the best to be found anywhere in the world.

Many famous and reputable individuals like artists Paul Cezanne, Vincent van Gogh, and authors like Peter Mayle enjoyed spending years in this location. The destination features a wondrous array of dramatic scenery, arid climates, hill-capping villages, bristling cities, and sprawling vineyards.

When to Go

Lavender Field near Valensole Provence Travel Guide
Lavender Field near Valensole

Summer is considered the peak tourist season in Provence, despite the fact that the combination of high crowds and warm temperatures can prove somewhat uncomfortable. Furthermore, while winters are considered mild, they can bring lots of wind and rain. In general, the Mediterranean climate shines especially bright during the fall and spring. If arriving in May or June, enjoy the Cannes Film Festival with its iconic lavender and sunflower fields in bloom. Conversely, if travelling close to September or October, enjoy a reduced amount of citizens in addition to more acceptable temperatures.

Avignon

Pont Saint Benezet bridge Provence Travel Guide
Pont Saint Benezet bridge

Three eye-catching locales near Avignon include the amazing aqueduct of Pont du Gard, the historical Roman monuments of Nîmes, and the walker-friendly town of Uzès, a relaxing getaway from the crowded cities.

Serving once as a critical connection between France and Comat Venaissin, the papal state, the Pont D’Avignon bridge extended 900m across the Rhone River. A stone version was constructed with nearly 2 dozen arches in substitution of the original wooden style. The Chapel of Saint Nicholas and 4 arches are all that remain.

Aix-en-Provence

Fontaine de la Rotonde.jpg
Fontaine de la Rotonde

The premier city for culture fanatics, this destination is a place for travelers to stroll curvy streets, pass by “1000 fountains“, and browse exquisite boutiques. Entertainment and art take center stage, and tourists can enjoy a wide array of tea houses, wine merchants, and Mediterranean cafes.

Marseille

Panorama view of Vieux Port, Marseille
Panorama view of Vieux Port, Marseille

There is only one other city in all of France larger than Marseille, and the second-largest has an abundance of offerings for everyone. On the coast, visitors can enjoy beautiful family-friendly beaches like the Plage de l’Estaque.

The highest building in the city, standing at 490 feet above sea level, is none other than the Basilica Notre-Dame de la Garde, a place that once served as the house of King Francois I. An incredibly rewarding way to get a sublime view and reach Byzantine architecture is to scale the steps all the way to the top.

Luberon

Old town medieval of Gordes city in Luberon area
Old town medieval of Gordes city in Luberon area

An expansive valley that represents one of the most intriguing and authentic areas in Provence, Luberon lets visitors enjoy the sensation of a place whose time has stood still for many centuries.

Its diverse landscapes offer plentiful hiking trips and bike tracks for cycling enthusiasts. For example, take a walk on the Oche Trail and enjoy natural canyons, pillars, and rust-red colored grounds.

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